Curious

This is What the Universe Looks Like in One Image

It is quite hard to imagine the planet Earth within the scope of the entire universe. Luckily, you don’t have to imagine it, because with the science advances and technology in that’s available today – this artist managed to create an image that shows the observable universe in one disc.

Pablo Carlos was able to do this by using logarithmic maps of the universe from Princeton and images from NASA.

The image

This image presents a solar system centric view of our own universe. This practically means that our Solar System and our Sun are located in the center of the image, followed by the outer ring of the Milky Way galaxy, a ring of other galaxies that are nearby (like Andromeda, for example), cosmic microwave background leftover from the Big Bang, the rest of the cosmic web and a ring of plasma that was also generated by the Big Bang.

Each chunk of the disc actually represents a field of view several orders of magnitude that are larger than the one before it, instead of showing all parts of the universe on a linear scale. That’s the secret why the entire universe is able to fit inside this circle.

We need this because the universe is incredibly large

Around 13.75 billion years ago when our own universe actually came into existence – primordial light has started shooting across the cosmos and spreading throughout it. Since then, the cosmos is growing at an ever increasing rate. Just a while back, cosmologists were able to estimate that the oldest photons that we were able to observe so far have actually traveled a distance of 45-47 billion light years, since the Big Bang happened. This practically means that our observable universe is about 93 billion light-years wide.

While Budassi was drawing hexaflexagons for his son’s birthday, he came up with the idea of logarithmic views of the cosmos. He was able to make this image by using Photoshop.

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